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Article
July 15, 1922

OBSERVATIONS ON THE ETIOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY OF CHOREA MINOR

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the New York Nursery and Child's Hospital, and the Department of Pediatrics, Cornell University Medical College.

JAMA. 1922;79(3):181-184. doi:10.1001/jama.1922.02640030007003
Abstract

Far reaching as have been the advances in modern methods of clinical and laboratory investigation, it cannot yet be said that a definite answer has been found to the problem of chorea minor. To the older physicians, it was a functional disorder of the brain; while to a younger generation, it may be of an infectious, a rheumatic, an organic, a toxic or even a syphilitic origin. Evidence may easily be found to support any of the above theories.

The disorganizing confusion which arose from classifying as chorea every morbid process which had as a distinguishing feature athetoid, bizarre or purposeless movements has, happily, long since been dispelled. To that extent, our problem is easier; but much unexplored ground remains to be covered before we can truthfully say what the actual causative factor is and what pathologic processes ensue.

In discussing the pathology of chorea minor, Poynton and Paine1

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