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Article
July 29, 1922

SOME COMPARATIVE RESULTS IN CITIES AND IN COUNTIES AS HEALTH UNITS

Author Affiliations

Director of County Health Work, Kansas State Board of Health TOPEKA, KAN.

JAMA. 1922;79(5):362-365. doi:10.1001/jama.1922.02640050024008
Abstract

The incorporated city as a unit of civil organization for the protection of the public health has so thoroughly justified its existence, efforts and expenditures that the question of the propriety of such an organization is no longer debatable. The evidence is all on the affirmative side.

Unfortunately, the county as a unit of organized civil efforts for the protection of the health of the people living in the rural communities and small towns is not so universally accepted. That the county as a unit has been neglected in the past is illustrated by the fact that the first position of full-time county health officer in this country was not established until 1911.1 That the problem is still being treated with indifference is evidenced by the fact that of the 3,065 counties or equivalent divisions of the continental United States, only 161, or 5.2 per cent., were on Jan.

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