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Article
September 2, 1922

HODGKIN'S DISEASE FOLLOWING DYSENTERY: RECOVERY OF PARASITES FROM STOOL AND IMPROVEMENT WITH ANTIPARASITIC TREATMENT

JAMA. 1922;79(10):809-810. doi:10.1001/jama.1922.02640100029009
Abstract

Little help of a very definite nature as to the cause of Hodgkin's disease has been at hand other than its suspected infectious origin. With opinions as to cause varying between tuberculosis, malignancy and the more common bacterial infections, one wonders why there has not been more expression in favor of parasitic origin. Recently Kofoid1 has called attention to the frequency of intestinal parasites in patients with Hodgkin's disease, and asserts that he has observed cell bodies which resemble amebas in the glands. This may bean important source of investigation, and might be the means of eliminating one more type of glandular enlargement from the group of Sternberg's disease, lymphosarcoma and malignant lymphogranuloma, of which too little of the etiology is known. It is quite possible, as Coplin2 has recently stated, that any irritative effect on glands might produce, according to stage, an inflammatory or malignant picture.

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