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Article
September 16, 1922

THE COEFFICIENT OF THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY OF EYE AND ORBIT: MEASURED WITH WARM APPLICATIONS

JAMA. 1922;79(12):936-939. doi:10.1001/jama.1922.02640120010005
Abstract

This paper is a continuation of one1 which was presented at the meeting of the Section on Ophthalmology of the American Medical Association at New Orleans in April, 1920. As the terms cold, warmth and heat are relative, in this connection I shall consider that cold means any low temperature up to about 15 C.; but it is considered zero unless otherwise specified. Warmth is a more generic term, but, when limited, means a range from about 15 to 30 C., and heat from 30 C. upward.

In the present statement concerning the effect of warm applications it is well to recall a few points, but the repetitions shall be as few and brief as possible. It will be remembered that the term "coefficient" means practically the rapidity at which a given degree of warmth, applied over a given area, penetrates the eye and orbit, and especially the depth to

References
1.
Howe, Lucien:  On the Coefficient of Thermal Conductivity of the Eye and Orbit Measured with Cold Applications ,  Tr. Sect. Ophth. A. M. A. 1920, p. 134.
2.
Macleod, J. J. R., and Taylor, N. B.:  Lancet 2: 70 ( (July 9) ) 1921.Crossref
3.
 In Penetration of the Tissues by Heat, editorial ,  J. A. M. A. 78: 351 ( (Feb. 4) ) 1922
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