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Article
July 5, 1924

THE USE OF SULPHARSPHENAMIN IN VINCENT'S ANGINA AND STOMATITIS IN CHILDREN

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK; MONTREAL
From the Home for Hebrew Infants.

JAMA. 1924;83(1):25-27. doi:10.1001/jama.1924.02660010029007
Abstract

Since Vincent,1 in 1896, first described the condition of the throat that bears his name, many remedies have been employed in its treatment. Originally, in France, local applications of tincture of iodin, of chromic acid, of glycerin formaldehyd and of methylene blue were used. Even in recent years, both abroad and in this country, local applications of various antiseptics have been employed. Buschmann 2 tried acriflavine. King 3 recommended a 10 per cent. solution of copper sulphate as a topical application, and hydrogen peroxid has been considered almost a local specific.

Since a spirillum, as well as the fusiform bacillus, was described as the causative agent, it was logical that arsphenamin should be used in the treatment of this disorder. Gerber4 used it intravenously in 1911. In 1914, Achard and Flandin 5 reported good results with local application of arsphenamin. Ravaut6 noted the favorable effect of local

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