[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
October 7, 1922

STUDIES ON THE RELATION OF THE THYROID TO PANCREATIC DIABETES IN DOGS: WITH SUGGESTIONS AS TO DIABETES MELLITUS IN MAN

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Department of Clinical Pathology, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University.

JAMA. 1922;79(15):1228-1234. doi:10.1001/jama.1922.02640150040010
Abstract

Little doubt as to the pancreatic origin of diabetes mellitus remains, since Weichselbaum1 demonstrated, by special staining methods in all diabetics from his large necropsy material, definite changes in the islands of Langerhans, and since Cecil2 noted similar changes at necropsies in seventy-nine of his ninety diabetics.

The fact, however, that glycosuria and hyperglycemia may be transient in some persons favors the assumption that anatomic changes in the islets must not necessarily be present in mild cases of the disease. Emotional causes may lead in some persons to a transient glycosuria, especially in those with a congenital inferiority of the pancreas. A temporary disturbance in the insular apparatus also occurs during infections, asin the course of chronic cholecystitis. Various drugs also may have this effect. Last but not least, certain endocrine disorders, such as hyperpituitary and hyperthyroid states, will occasionally lead to glycosuria and even to true diabetes

×