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Article
July 19, 1924

USE OF STEEL PHONOGRAPH NEEDLE AS A RETAINING PIN IN CERTAIN IRREDUCIBLE FRACTURES OF THE SMALL BONES

JAMA. 1924;83(3):193. doi:10.1001/jama.1924.26610030002009b

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Abstract

The need for a small but easily applied pin for the retention of obstinate displaced fragments in small bone injuries, I have found to be very satisfactorily met by the use of the small phonograph needle. This needle is made of tough steel, with an exceedingly smooth, highly polished surface, and comes to a well tapered point which readily admits of pushing through the approximated bone segments by simply placing the needle in a good holder and pushing (not driving) it through the bone. This method assures the pin of firm seating, or transfixation, and it is seldom necessary to remove it, although placed in the presence of infected tissue, as in open fractures. These needles are applicable in oblique fractures about the hands, foot, patella and clavicle and other small bones, and in many instances may be pushed through the skin, making no more than a needle puncture.

The

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