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Article
August 9, 1924

GASTRIC SYMPTOMS: WITH PARTICULAR REFERENCE TO GALLBLADDER DISEASE

Author Affiliations

SEATTLE
From the Virginia Mason Hospital.

JAMA. 1924;83(6):412-416. doi:10.1001/jama.1924.02660060016005
Abstract

Three years ago, we presented a statistical study of one thousand consecutive patients complaining of chronic dyspepsia.1 It was brought out then that gallbladder disease is the most frequent organic cause of dyspepsia in adults, and that this condition is responsible for one fifth of chronic dyspepsias.

We have continued this investigation, and now bring forward facts elicited from the examination of 1,650 cases, carefully examined by us and our associates. Such examinations have included clinical history and physical examination, clinical and roentgenologic gastric study, and the usual routine laboratory tests, including urinalysis, Wassermann test, and other roentgen-ray and laboratory examinations when indicated.

These diagnoses have been made with as great accuracy as our combined efforts and facilities would permit. That errors must exist is manifest; yet we feel that the same percentage of error is fairly constant and hence the figures are relatively correct. We hazard the opinion,

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