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Article
August 9, 1924

SPLENIC ENLARGEMENT IN CHRONIC CARDIAC DISEASE

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA

JAMA. 1924;83(6):423-425. doi:10.1001/jama.1924.02660060027009
Abstract

The splenomegaly of acute endocarditis is well recognized. The importance of splenic enlargement in subacute bacterial endocarditis as a diagnostic sign has been stressed during the last decade. Is there an important splenomegaly in chronic cardiac failure by congestion due to stasis alone?

In attempting to answer this question we shall consider: the volume of the normal spleen; the means of detecting moderate splenomegaly; the circulation of the spleen, and the evidence of pathologist and clinician, and finally see whether well taken hospital histories reflect the conclusions otherwise derived.

The normal spleen varies from 150 to 20 gm. As it normally is equivalent to 1/350 part of the body weight, the 150 gm. spleen would correspond to an individual weighing roughly 52 kg., or 115 pounds; the 200 gm. spleen to an individual weighing 70 kg., or 154 pounds. The spleen is relatively smaller in women, and tends to atrophy

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