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Article
August 9, 1924

A METHOD OF OBTAINING ANTERIOR SYMPATHETIC ANESTHESIA IN ABDOMINAL SURGERY

Author Affiliations

MINNEAPOLIS

JAMA. 1924;83(6):429-432. doi:10.1001/jama.1924.02660060033012
Abstract

In order to obtain success, using the term "success" in its broadest sense, in the application of local anesthesia to abdominal surgery, one must meet two definite and unqualified demands: (1) anesthesia of the abdominal wall covering a sufficient area to permit the necessary intraperitoneal manipulations; and (2) the establishment of intraperitoneal anesthesia (abdominal sympathetic system), which will allow one to carry out the required operative procedures without complaint on the part of the patient and without interference with the surgeon in his efforts. So closely related to the establishment of such anesthesia are numerous other factors that the introduction of the anesthetic into either of the aforementioned regions becomes, as a matter of fact, of secondary importance. In other words, the establishment of anesthesia and the successful performance of a major abdominal operation are so closely correlated with a large number of details that a mere discussion of the

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