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Article
December 2, 1922

MALOCCLUSION AND ITS FARREACHING EFFECTS

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Forsyth Dental Infirmary for Children.

JAMA. 1922;79(23):1895-1897. doi:10.1001/jama.1922.02640230005002
Abstract

When we consider from the standpoint of beauty and comfort the great blessing of a healthy oral cavity, we cannot but wonder why the medical profession has only at this late date come to stress its importance. It is in this area more than anywhere else in the human body that prevention—the ideal of the physician—can be exercised. It has already been pointed out1 that caries, the most frequent disorder of the oral cavity, can be at least greatly minimized by both prenatal and postnatal influences; prenatally not only by giving particular attention to the diet of the mother for the formation of teeth of her unborn child, but also by preventing any disturbance in the mother's metabolism that might interefere with the assimilation of food. Postnatally, the physician should advise for the child a diet which provides for continuation of adequate tooth formation, and which also aids in

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