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Article
December 2, 1922

GLIOMA OF THE CEREBRAL HEMISPHERES: A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF TWO CASES

Author Affiliations

DES MOINES, IOWA

JAMA. 1922;79(23):1913-1917. doi:10.1001/jama.1922.02640230023008
Abstract

Tumors arising within the cranial cavity are, without doubt, of far more frequent occurrence than is generally believed. Not infrequently postmortem examinations reveal the presence of a growth involving the brain which gave few or no symptoms antemortem. It has long been conceded that the brain is a favorite site of new formations, and that among the more frequent type of tumors found in new growths of the brain, glioma holds a very high percentage. Glioma may vary in size from that of a hazelnut to that of a fist, or even larger. There is no sharply defined line of demarcation from the surrounding brain substance as a rule, and, in contradistinction to many other types of neoplasm involving the brain, this type of tumor does not extend by pressure, but rather by infiltration of the brain substance, destroying normal nerve cells and fibers and replacing them by pathologic tissue.

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