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Article
December 16, 1922

CESAREAN SECTION: ITS INDICATIONS AND TECHNIC BASED ON TWO HUNDRED AND FIFTY-TWO OPERATIONS

Author Affiliations

Associate in Obstetrics, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine; Assistant Obstetrician, St. Agnes Hospital PHILADELPHIA

JAMA. 1922;79(25):2047-2051. doi:10.1001/jama.1922.02640250001001

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Abstract

The indications for cesarean section can be divided into two classes: (1) the absolute, in which there is no question of choice, and (2) the relative, in which a choice of methods of delivery exists, but cesarean section seems to give the best chance of safety for both mother and child.

The absolute indications are comparatively simple: (1) a contracted pelvis, with a conjugate at the brim of less than 7 cm., or with other measurements so small that delivery could be accomplished in no other way; (2) complete obstruction of the pelvic canal by a fibroid tumor, ovarian cyst or tumor of the sacrum; (3) a gigantic child, whose head will not engage in the pelvic inlet and whose anterior parietal eminence projects well beyond the symphysis.

In all these' cases, safe delivery by methods other than cesarean section is out of the question. It must be remembered, however,

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