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Article
September 27, 1924

TUMORS OF THE PANCREAS: OPERATIONS PERFORMED ON TWELVE PATIENTS

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA

JAMA. 1924;83(13):984-989. doi:10.1001/jama.1924.02660130024008
Abstract

Malignant disease of the pancreas is, in most cases, treated by a palliative operation. A radical operation is rarely possible because the disease is usually advanced, and there is involvement of the surrounding structures. Some tumors of the tail and of the body of the pancreas have been excised or resected. In one of the patients whose case is reported in this paper, I removed two tumor masses of sarcoma from the head of the pancreas. Excision of the head of the pancreas is a formidable type of surgery, and complete extirpation of this organ is followed by the death of the patient. Carcinoma of the pancreas is more common than we formerly believed. Sarcoma is very rare.

The problems associated with surgery of tumors of the pancreas are (1) diagnostic, (2) anatomic and (3) physiologic. Radical surgery in connection with the pancreas is always difficult because of the anatomic

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