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Article
December 23, 1922

HOMOPLASTIC AND HETEROPLASTIC TUMOR GRAFTS IN THE BRAIN

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research.

JAMA. 1922;79(26):2159-2160. doi:10.1001/jama.1922.02640260031012
Abstract

Recently, Shirai1 of Tokyo reported the interesting observation that heteroplastic tumors grow readily when inoculated into the brain, this being the first example of successful transplanting of heteroplastic tissues to normal adult animals. Previous to this, the tissues of one species had been transplanted to another only in the embryo2 and in adult animals after exposure to roentgen rays.3 Certain deductions had been made from these earlier experiments, which led to the conclusion that the lymphoid cell was an active and probably necessary part of the defensive mechanism against such tissue grafts. The basis for this conclusion was as follows: (a) Lymphocytes occur in large numbers about a heteroplastic graft. (b) Foreign tissues growing in the chick embryo called out no cellular reaction until after the eighteenth day of incubation, a time which corresponds with the limit of growth of the foreign tissue. After the appearance of

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