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Article
January 6, 1923

OBSERVATIONS ON THE CORRECTION OF DEFORMITIES OF LONG STANDING

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Hospital for Ruptured and Crippled, First Division.

JAMA. 1923;80(1):18-20. doi:10.1001/jama.1923.02640280020008

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Abstract

There has always been a difference of opinion with regard to the treatment of severe paralysis following anterior poliomyelitis. One group has contended that locomotion with braces and crutches was too difficult and painful to be of any advantage to the patient. It has maintained that such patients are dependent anyway, to the extent that they need assistance to get into their braces; and, such being the case, they might as well be allowed to sit about in peace with no attempt made to prevent the inevitable development of flexion contractions at the hips and knees.

Other surgeons take the view that deformity should be prevented as a matter of routine, and that deformity already existing should be corrected. They insist that a certain amount of independence is of great value, both practical and psychologic, to any patient, and that the possession of the power of independent locomotion, even if

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