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Article
January 13, 1923

SOME OCULAR PHASES OF LITTLE'S DISEASE (CONGENITAL SPASTIC RIGIDITY OF THE LIMBS): REPORT OF CASES

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA

JAMA. 1923;80(2):80-82. doi:10.1001/jama.1923.02640290010003
Abstract

In 1861, Little, a British orthopedist, called attention to a condition not infrequently observed in consequence of premature births, mechanical injuries during parturition to the fetal head, etc., in consequence of which convulsions are excited after birth, and are succeeded by a determinate affection of the limbs of the child, which he designated "spastic rigidity of the limbs of new-born children, spastic rigidity from asphyxia neonatorum," and assimilated it to the trismus nascentium and the universal spastic rigidity sometimes produced at later periods of existence. It is manifestly outside the scope of this paper to discuss the general neurologic aspects of this condition, now usually designated as "Little's disease," though it may not be amiss to give a short clinical description of it, to refresh our memory, burdened with so many things ophthalmologic that the symptomatology of some of the rarer neurologic conditions at times escapes us.

According to Oppenheim,

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