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Article
February 3, 1923

EGGS AS A SOURCE OF VITAMIN B

Author Affiliations

NEW HAVEN, CONN.

JAMA. 1923;80(5):302-303. doi:10.1001/jama.1923.02640320014004
Abstract

That hen's eggs contain vitamins is evident from experiments conducted long before the importance of these food factors in nutrition was recognized. Thus, in 1891, Socin1 reported having successfully fed mice on a mixture of starch, cellulose and egg yolk for ninety-nine days, and he believed that they could have continued to thrive on this diet. Following the discovery of experimental polyneuritis in birds, egg products were repeatedly tested, with successful outcome, for their antineuritic potency.2

As the white of egg is said to contain no vitamin,3 the yolk acquires the preeminent interest in respect to this factor. One finds the statement that the yolk is "especially rich" in both vitamin A and vitamin B.4 Eggs are frequently classed with milk in such generalizations. Our experience with the latter food has shown that its content of vitamin B, while noteworthy, is by no means invariably as

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