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Article
February 3, 1923

ANIMAL AND VEGETABLE PATHOLOGY IN RELATION TO HUMAN DISEASES

JAMA. 1923;80(5):324-325. doi:10.1001/jama.1923.02640320036014
Abstract

At the recent meeting of the British Medical Association, a special session was devoted to the relation of animal and vegetable pathology to human diseases.1 Vegetable diseases, so far as we know, have no significance as sources of human disease, if intoxication with the products of fungus infection, as in ergotism, is excepted. These diseases do, however, offer many problems that are of importance as sources of information concerning human pathology. Thus, several plant diseases are produced by filtrable viruses. Much of our knowledge concerning these important pathogenic agents we owe to the discovery, made as long ago as 1892, that the mosaic disease of tobacco is produced by an invisible agent that passes through filters that are impervious to ordinary bacteria. Several infectious diseases of plants share with animal diseases the peculiarity of insect transmission, and in at least one of them, it seems, part of the life

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