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Article
November 8, 1924

NEWER CLINICAL SIGNS OF EARLY RICKETS

Author Affiliations

PORTLAND, ORE.

JAMA. 1924;83(19):1469-1473. doi:10.1001/jama.1924.02660190001001
Abstract

Nearly three centuries ago, rickets was recognized and very ably described by a group of English physicians, Glisson, Bate and Regenmarter.1 The first recorded death from this disease was in 1630.2 Boötius, 3 in 1649, writing in Latin, said of rickets, "This malady is a sore affection in many thousand infants." An equal prevalence of rickets today warrants our interest in it, while our newer methods of study enable us to recognize even the milder cases of the disease. The Pacific Northwest, with its great number of cloudy days, seems a very fertile soil for this infantile dyscrasia.

Experimental evidence indicates that clinical manifestations of the disease occur first in the nervous system, secondly in the muscular system, and thirdly in the bony system.4 This paper, however, will be confined to some of the more important skeletal signs. Guérin 5 considered that rickets was manifested first in

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