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Article
November 8, 1924

THE USE OF DISCARDED ANTITOXIN SERUM SYRINGES FOR AEROBIC AND ANAEROBIC CULTURE CONTAINERS

Author Affiliations

Chicago
From the Department of Bacteriology, Pathology and Preventive Medicine, Loyola University School of Medicine.

JAMA. 1924;83(19):1506. doi:10.1001/jama.1924.26610190002013c

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Abstract

The usual antitoxin serum syringe, after it has been used, can be cleaned and filled with bouillon or other fluid culture medium. With the plunger retracted, the cylinder filled with the culture medium to the desired level and the needle in place, the whole is then autoclaved. After sterilization, the needle is removed and the opening closed with hot paraffin. When it is desired to inoculate this culture, the needle is sterilized by boiling, and while it is hot the paraffin plug is punctured and the needle fixed in place over the end of the syringe. A necessary amount of the medium is expressed from the syringe, and the material from which the culture is to be made is sucked up into the cylinder. This can be used for blood cultures; venipunctures can be made directly with the needle, or for obtaining inoculum from any kind of material, pus or

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