[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
February 10, 1923

THE USE OF CREATININ AS A TEST OF RENAL FUNCTION

Author Affiliations

KANSAS CITY, KAN.
From the Department of Internal Medicine of the University of Kansas School of Medicine.

JAMA. 1923;80(6):384-386. doi:10.1001/jama.1923.02640330020010
Abstract

Many new tests for the functional activity of the kidneys are being introduced from time to time. Most of these tests are carried out by studying the excretion of a foreign substance, usually a dyestuff, by the kidneys. One notable exception is the employment of urea as a functional test by Addis and Watanabe1 and by McLean and de Wesselow.2

The frequent addition of new tests does not necessarily imply any dissatisfaction with those tests now in use, but indicates an increasing appreciation of the complex process usually designated as "renal function." Most students of kidney diseases have noted and emphasized the peculiar variability of different kidneys in the excretion of different substances. This variability calls for the employment of several tests if we wish a composite picture and not a fragmentary view of the kidney's functional activity.

Creatinin seems for many reasons to be an excellent substance

×