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Article
December 20, 1924

PERINEAL PROSTATECTOMY: WITH PARTICULAR REFERENCE TO SACRAL ANESTHESIA AND TO HEMOSTASIS

Author Affiliations

OMAHA
From the Department of Urology, University of Nebraska College of Medicine.

JAMA. 1924;83(25):1988-1993. doi:10.1001/jama.1924.02660250026007
Abstract

Measures tending toward the lessening of the hemorrhage hazard and the shock hazard, and providing better opportunity for operative exposure and deliberation, should tend toward lessening the sum total of surgical mishaps, and toward better functional results. There are obvious reasons why such measures are particularly indicated in the operation of prostatectomy, which has to deal so frequently with human derelicts. With full realization that in prostatectomy the chief opportunity for the saving of lives lies rather in the preoperative treatment than in the operative technic, this paper is presented with the purpose of directing attention toward two variations in operative methods: (1) the use of sacral anesthesia in perineal prostatectomy, and (2) the use of a distensible rubber bag designed for hemostasis following perineal prostatectomy.

In all surgical procedures, complete hemostasis is primarily dependent on deliberate, careful dissection under visual control and with minimum trauma; and on accurate ligation

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