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Article
April 14, 1923

THE OLD HEAD INJURY CASE: A CLINICAL STUDY OF ONE HUNDRED CASES

Author Affiliations

Chief of Nervous and Mental Clinic, Outpatient Department, University Hospital; Attending Consultant in Neuropsychiatry, U. S. Veterans' Bureau, District 10 MINNEAPOLIS

JAMA. 1923;80(15):1047-1050. doi:10.1001/jama.1923.02640420009003
Abstract

The literature on head injuries has been greatly augmented as a result of the many observations made during the World War. The treatises, however, deal in the majority of instances with the acute cases and early complications.

For several years the opportunity for observing old head injury cases, incurred chiefly during the year 1918, has presented itself. The questions What becomes of the man who has suffered a head wound? How is he able to carry on? What measures does he require as time goes on? are rather vital. The clinical pictures show many and varied symptoms. One is early impressed by the degree of associated disability. The latter phase particularly seemed worthy of special study and prompted a grouping of these cases, aiming at setting down, as far as possible, a fair longitudinal section of the chronic case.

This study deals with 100 patients, all of whom, except two,

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