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Article
April 14, 1923

RECURRING ILEOCECAL INTUSSUSCEPTION: REPORT OF A CASE COMPLICATED BY TUBERCULOSIS OF THE INTESTINE

Author Affiliations

SANTA MARIA, CALIF.

JAMA. 1923;80(15):1063-1065. doi:10.1001/jama.1923.02640420025010

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Abstract

The cause of intussusception is not always clear. It is easy enough to understand how a pedunculated tumor large enough to be caught in a peristaltic wave ahead can cause the intestinal wall at its base to become invaginated. But what is the particular cause, or causes, responsible for intussusception occurring most frequently at the ileocecal junction? Is it due to a too mobile cecum, or to a less mobile one, as either condition could mechanically predispose to invagination? Or is it due to violent enterospasm of the small intestine just at its juncture with the cecum? For the latter reason, ileo-ileac invagination does occur. With such an enterospasm, however, intussusception into the cecum could not occur if the ileocecal valve were small enough, and of sufficient firmness.

One can understand that the small intestine, having far greater peristaltic activity than the sluggish colon, might be constantly tending to invaginate

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