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Article
January 10, 1925

A STUDY OF PROTEIN ABSORPTION FROM THE DIGESTIVE TRACT BY THE PRECIPITIN TEST: WITH ESPECIAL REFERENCE TO THYROGLOBULIN

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO

From the John McCormick Institute for Infectious Diseases and the Division of Physiology and Pharmacology of Northwestern University Medical School.

JAMA. 1925;84(2):114. doi:10.1001/jama.1925.02660280040012
Abstract

The experiments, the results of which we now report briefly, were made in the course of studies of the precipitin reaction of the digestive mucosa,1 in order to learn, if possible, whether certain antigenic substances, taken into the stomach under special conditions, can be traced into the blood by means of the precipitin test.

In all the experiments, apparently healthy dogs were used. All food was withheld for two or three days, and in our first series the dogs then were fed raw beef, 500 gm. each, and killed by bleeding under anesthesia in from half an hour to three hours later. Thorough perfusion with salt solution was done at once, and extracts of the digestive mucosa in salt solution prepared as described elsewhere.1 The extracts, filtered clear, and the serum of the portal and systemic blood, were tested with antiserums for the antigen peculiar to the digestive

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