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Article
April 21, 1923

ETIOLOGIC STUDY OF A SERIES OF OPTIC NEUROPATHIES

Author Affiliations

BALTIMORE; SUMTER, S. C.
From the Department of Surgery of the Johns Hopkins Hospital and University.

JAMA. 1923;80(16):1113-1117. doi:10.1001/jama.1923.02640430001001
Abstract

During the past five years many articles have appeared, especially in the American literature, that attribute various types of the optic neuropathies to disease of the accessory nasal sinuses; and, notably, White1 has reported a large number of such cases. In several papers, papilledema of a high degree has been ascribed to an infection of the posterior ethmoidal and sphenoidal sinuses. Visual disturbances, and even organic changes in the optic nerve, have been attributed to sinus disease in patients who have no discharge, polyps, local redness, or swelling of the mucous membrane around the orifices of the sinuses, or, indeed, any other of the usual manifestations of sinus disease. This has been a source of confusion to the laryngologist and internist, and particularly to the ophthalmologist, the neurologist and the neurologic surgeon.2 Moreover, the emphasis that has been placed on sinus disease as an etiologic factor in optic

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