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Article
January 24, 1925

MEDICAL EDUCATION AND MEDICAL SERVICE: I. THE SITUATION

JAMA. 1925;84(4):281-285. doi:10.1001/jama.1925.26620300002013
Abstract

In my address to the House of Delegates,1 I called attention to the serious difficulties in medical service that are developing under our present policy in medical education. But the subject is so large that a summary of it was all that was possible in that address. I am therefore returning to it here in order to consider more fully some of its most important aspects.

Twenty-five years ago, medical education was in a disorganized state. There had been no lack of honest effort in most institutions to live up to their responsibilities as best they could, but there was no dominating force of national extent that could effectively insist on what these responsibilities were and how they should be met. In this situation, the Association stepped in and assumed direction and, through the Council on Medical Education under the courageous leadership of Dr. Bevan, produced a revolution. The

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