[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
January 31, 1925

RESTORATION OF THE SCALP: THE MANAGEMENT OF SKIN GRAFTS

Author Affiliations

CLEVELAND
From the Surgical Department of the Western Reserve University School of Medicine.

JAMA. 1925;84(5):350-352. doi:10.1001/jama.1925.02660310024007
Abstract

Scalping, though fortunately uncommon, is a distressing accident, frequently followed, unless promptly and properly treated, by unsightly cicatricial deformities. Immediate restoration of the avulsed scalp has apparently never succeeded.1 Some form of skin grafting is therefore inevitable in all cases of scalping.

To the surgeon of today, skin grafting is an indispensible adjunct to his technical equipment, and he should make himself thoroughly familiar with (1) the many situations in which grafting may be used to great advantage; (2) the indications for the selection of the most available type of grafting in each instance, and (3) the best manner of applying and nursing the various forms of transplanted skin to a complete "take." The epithelization of burned areas may be accomplished by a simple procedure which should be known and practiced in every hospital. During my service at the Johns Hopkins Hospital we were constantly confronted with extensive granulating

×