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May 19, 1923

THE DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSIS OF NEURITIS AND CONDITIONS SIMULATING ITWITH ESPECIAL REFERENCE TO POSTINFLUENZAL MULTIPLE NEURITIS AND ATAXIA

JAMA. 1923;80(20):1443-1445. doi:10.1001/jama.1923.02640470021009
Abstract

Perhaps no diagnosis is made with less foundation in fact and made so loosely as the diagnosis of neuritis, a term that is usually applied by the physician and the layman to connote a variety of conditions, the chief symptom of which is pain. If neuritis is of the mixed variety, that is, both motor and sensory, or if of the sensory type, it will be associated with pain; however, the two commonest types of neuritis seen in civil practice are instances of motor neuritis and hence are unassociated with pain. These two conditions are involvement of the seventh nerve and of the musculospiral, and are usually due, in the first instance, to exposure to a draft, and in the second, to pressure. A mononeuritis involving a mixed nerve and hence a condition which gives rise to pain, is extremely uncommon, the ulnar, median and sciatic nerves being only rarely

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