[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 35.168.111.204. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
May 19, 1923

THE ADMINISTRATION OF HYPERTONIC SALT SOLUTIONS FOR THE RELIEF OF INTRACRANIAL PRESSURE

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA
From the neurosurgical clinic of Dr. Charles H. Frazier, University Hospital.

JAMA. 1923;80(20):1445-1448. doi:10.1001/jama.1923.02640470023010
Abstract

The use of magnesium sulphate to assist in controlling intracranial tension was first introduced into this clinic a little more than two years ago. During this time, certain observations as to its effects and mode of administration have been recorded, and the conditions in which its use is beneficial will be noted. It was adopted by the neurosurgical service as a means of reducing intracranial pressure and volume, following my observation that infants showed a marked retraction of the fontanels after its use, because of the dehydration that it produces throughout the cerebral system.

At the time a method brought forward by Cushing and Foley1 of the intravenous injection of 35 per cent, sodium chlorid solution was in use, but since that time this method has been replaced in the majority of cases by the easier and more satisfactory administration of magnesium sulphate solution, either by rectum or by

×