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Article
February 14, 1925

A STUDY OF THE CLINICAL COURSE OF GENERALIZED EDEMA: WITH SUGGESTIONS AS TO ITS POSSIBLE FUNCTION

Author Affiliations

Assistant Attending Physician, Children's Memorial Hospital, Chicago WINNETKA, ILL.

JAMA. 1925;84(7):481-486. doi:10.1001/jama.1925.02660330001001
Abstract

From a perusal of current literature, it appears that generalized edema is usually looked on as an unfavorable symptom, or as a complication occurring in disease. Observation of cases of edema in children prompted the thought that sufficient consideration has not been given to the possibility that edema may be more than this, that it may be a pathologic process tending to follow a definite course. Since most pathologic processes are now quite generally considered to have protective or curative functions, it seemed not unlikely that generalized edema might also in some way have a purpose.

About two years ago, in discussing with me the treatment of an edematous patient, Dr. Joseph Brennemann protested against fluid restriction, saying that he did not see how this could do a toxic patient any good. On consideration, this protest seemed well founded, although I had previously felt that fluid restriction combined with dehydrating

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