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Article
February 14, 1925

END-RESULTS OF OPERATION FOR CLAW-FOOT

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Clinic of the New York Orthopedic Dispensary and Hospital.

JAMA. 1925;84(7):499-501. doi:10.1001/jama.1925.02660330019008
Abstract

In the course of an investigation to determine end-results in conditions treated at the New York Ortho paedic Dispensary and Hospital, a study was made of patients on whom an operation for claw-foot was performed.

The operation, which consists in the transference of the extensor digitorum longus and extensor hallucis longus tendons, was devised by Hibbs and was first described by him in 1919.1 All such patients who were operated on from 1916 to 1921, and who responded to an appeal to return for examination, were included. In all, there were 124 patients, on sixty-two of whom the procedure was carried out on both feet, making in all 186 operations. The work was that of thirteen different surgeons. The cases were seen at an interval of from two to six years after operation. The original condition, for which the procedure was carried out, was claw-foot deformity with hammer-toes, impaired

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