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Article
February 14, 1925

MEDICAL EDUCATION AND MEDICAL SERVICE: IV. THE REAL REMEDY: REDUCTION IN THE EXPENSIVENESS OF MEDICAL TRAINING

JAMA. 1925;84(7):513-515. doi:10.1001/jama.1925.26620330008012
Abstract

The suggestions we are offering furnish no direct solution of the difficulties. Yet consideration of the situation leaves no doubt that if the problem is to be left to us it must be met directly. And the only way we can do that will be by the adoption of a system of medical education which will act to relieve the situation in accordance with economic law; which will not be so expensive that it will only produce graduates who are above the ordinary world's work; and which will not be beyond the opportunity of men who, at the price they have paid for their profession, will be willing to meet the ordinary demands of medical service. Will such a course meet the situation and is such a policy in medical education practicable?

No one would go back to the irresponsible condition of medical education thirty years ago. Fortunately, it is

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