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Article
February 28, 1925

VALUE OF ELECTROTHERMIC METHODS IN THE TREATMENT OF MALIGNANCY

Author Affiliations

BALTIMORE
From the Howard A. Kelly Hospital, Inc.

JAMA. 1925;84(9):660-666. doi:10.1001/jama.1925.02660350024006
Abstract

During the last decade, the successful treatment of cancer has been greatly facilitated by improvements in our physical methods; namely, roentgen ray and radium. General surgeons have paid no little attention to heat, a most potent factor in destroying neoplastic cells without serious damage to surrounding healthy tissues, and with a resultant slowly healing, indolent, sclerotic ulceration, although it has not been universally accepted and used. The reason for the apparent general discard of so powerful a therapeutic agent has undoubtedly been the lack of any efficient apparatus and technic to cause penetration of the heat sufficiently deep to kill the cells at a distance from the point of application. Boiling water, superheated steam and aerocauterization have fallen into disuse because accurate and convenient application is impossible and penetration is limited. Other heat producing apparatus, as the Paquelin and electric cauteries, destroy cells at the point of contact and for

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