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Article
June 9, 1923

AGGLUTINATION TEST FOR THE PRESENCE OF BACILLUS DIPHTHERIAE IN FIELD (MIXED) CULTURES: PRELIMINARY NOTE

Author Affiliations

Professor of Hygiene and Preventive Medicine; Director Connaught Antitoxin Laboratories, University of Toronto TORONTO; BERKELEY, CALIF.
From the Department of Bacteriology and Experimental Pathology, University of California.

JAMA. 1923;80(23):1675-1677. doi:10.1001/jama.1923.02640500017007
Abstract

The problem of differentiating true B. diphtheriae from diphtheroids and other morphologically similar species of micro-organisms is one of constant interest and often of considerable difficulty to bacteriologists and public health laboratory workers. The criteria ordinarily applied in the routine examination of throat cultures are typical morphology and virulence. These satisfy the requirements in the great majority of instances when the cultures are taken from the exudate in well-marked cases of diphtheria when very little doubt could possibly arise as to diagnosis. In the examination of smears from such cultures, every field of the microscope, as a rule, presents great numbers of granular and beaded forms of B. diphtheriae, chiefly Types C and D in Wesbrook's classification. It is not difficult in these circumstances to isolate B. diphtheriae in pure culture, to perform virulence tests and to determine the carbohydrate fermentation reactions. If any doubt whatever exists, protection experiments with

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