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Article
March 7, 1925

THE BLOOD COUNT IN CARCINOMA OF THE ESOPHAGUS

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Admitting Department, Mount Sinai Hospital, New York.

JAMA. 1925;84(10):734-736. doi:10.1001/jama.1925.02660360016007
Abstract

The most important disease of the esophagus is cancer. Only cancer of the uterus, female breast and stomach outnumber it. McCrae 1 in 5,480 necropsies found twenty-nine cases of esophageal carcinoma, or 0.53 per cent. It is three times as frequent in the male as in the female. The condition is nearly always primary, and it is described as having a predilection for the upper, middle and lower portions of the esophagus. When the growth is secondary, it is usually found at the cardiac end of the stomach. (Vinson2 states that in men lesions are most common in the middle third of the esophagus, whereas in women growths predominate in the upper third.) The fact is that the primary neoplasm may occur anywhere along the gullet.

Ewing 3 describes the gross picture as of three types: (1) flat infiltrating ulcer; (2) more bulky polypoid or globular type, and (3)

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