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Article
June 16, 1923

CONGENITAL STRICTURES OF THE ESOPHAGUS

Author Affiliations

ROCHESTER, MINN.
From the Division of Medicine, Mayo Clinic.

JAMA. 1923;80(24):1754-1755. doi:10.1001/jama.1923.02640510010004
Abstract

The literature concerning complete congenital strictures of the esophagus has been reviewed very fully by Plass,1 Griffith and Lavenson,2 Cautley3 and Hirsch,4 and I shall not endeavor to analyze the cases they have compiled. There have been numerous types of esophageal deformity, but the majority of them are represented by Figure 1 a, in which the upper portion of the esophagus ends in a blind pouch and the lower portion enters the trachea, or a bronchus forming an esophagotracheal or esophagobronchial fistula. Another type of stricture (Fig. 1b) is represented by an upper and a lower culdesac connected by a strand of tissue. A third type is similar to this, with the exception that there is no connection between the two segments.

Again there may be an upper culdesac only, sometimes connected with the stomach by strands of tissue. These strands, however, are often absent.

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