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Article
June 16, 1923

SOME ORIGINAL BLOOD PRESSURE OBSERVATIONS

Author Affiliations

WELLSVILLE, N. Y.

JAMA. 1923;80(24):1767-1769. doi:10.1001/jama.1923.02640510023010
Abstract

A correct interpretation of blood pressure findings is becoming a matter of the greatest importance. The time has gone by when the mere knowledge of a patient's systolic blood pressure was all that was necessary in order to arrive at a correct diagnosis.

In the study of cardiovascular renal diseases, we find many diversified and interesting phenomena. These are each varied and distinct factors, but so closely related that they must all be taken into consideration if we are to arrive at intelligent conclusions. We have alterations (1) in the composition of the blood itself which are caused either by changes in the corpuscular content, by variations in the blood viscosity, or by circulating toxins; (2) in the venous pressure; (3) in the cardiac rhythm, and (4) of the greatest importance, and either temporary or permanent, in the caliber of the arterial venous and capillary circulation.

SAME SYSTOLIC PRESSURE IN 

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