[Skip to Navigation]
Article
March 14, 1925

LOW, OR CERVICAL, CESAREAN SECTION (LAPAROTRACHELOTOMY): THREE HUNDRED AND THIRTY OPERATIONS, WITH TWO DEATHS

JAMA. 1925;84(11):791-798. doi:10.1001/jama.1925.02660370001001
Abstract

Puerperal infection, eclampsia and hemorrhage still carry away thousands of our mothers annually. Many of these lives could be saved if all accoucheurs were fully alive to the possibilities of modern obstetrics. Another factor that contributes to the high maternal mortality—growing bigger every year—is cesarean section. Letters from the U. S. Bureau of the Census indicate that the number of deaths following cesarean section in the death registration area in 1920 was 212; in 1921, 247, and in 1922, 266. The data from this cause do not include such deaths reported jointly with puerperal albuminuria and convulsions, puerperal septicemia, etc. Dr. William H. Davis, chief statistician for vital statistics, points out that it is not possible, from the information given on the death certificates, to determine in all cases whether peritonitis results from cesarean section or is a part of ordinary puerperal sepsis. "However," he says, "the practice of assignment

×