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Article
June 23, 1923

EPINEPHRIN AND THE REVIVAL OF THE HEART

JAMA. 1923;80(25):1853-1854. doi:10.1001/jama.1923.02640520035015
Abstract

The widespread interest with reference to the use of epinephrin as a life-saving drug, because of its apparent power to revivify the human heart under certain untoward conditions, is a natural consequence of some of the publicity that the subject has received. There is something uniquely dramatic in the response of a heart, which has apparently ceased its action, under unexpected circumstances. It presents the possibility of successful restoration of life when death seems already to have been ushered in. Thus, the fear of the end may become replaced by the hope of survival in many instances in which untoward conditions presage the interruption of life through failure of the circulation. The outstanding facts in regard to what has actually been accomplished in an experimental way and has been reported from clinical sources were reviewed in a recent issue of The Journal.1 They stress the long known observation that

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