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Article
March 14, 1925

Manual of Psychiatry for the Medical Student and General Practitioner.

JAMA. 1925;84(11):843. doi:10.1001/jama.1925.02660370053043

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Abstract

This book is intended to be a textbook of psychiatry, particularly intended, according to the preface by the author, for the student or practitioner of medicine who is not specializing in psychiatry. The attempt has been made, therefore, to condense the material and to avoid controversial discussions. The book is essentially an epitomized, condensed statement of mental disorders and examination and treatment, with some discussion of the relationship between psychiatric and social problems. Thus a chapter is devoted to the relationship of insanity to crime. Another chapter considers the Binet-Simon scale of intelligence tests. The process of condensation has perhaps been carried beyond practical limits. Because of an endeavor to present only well established facts in the briefest possible space, the reader unequipped with independent knowledge of the subject is left without some of the stabilizing considerations, and may infer facts when facts are hard to find. The scope of

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