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Article
July 28, 1923

THE USE OF ANTISERUMS IN THE TREATMENT OF DISEASE

JAMA. 1923;81(4):284-287. doi:10.1001/jama.1923.02650040024008
Abstract

Thirty-five years have elapsed since Hericourt and Richet demonstrated the fact that the serum of dogs that had been actively immunized against a certain staphylococcus had, by transfusion, the property of curing otherwise fatal infections due to this organism in unprepared rabbits. This important principle of transferred or passive immunity has since that time been repeatedly demonstrated experimentally in connection with many other pathogenic bacteria and their toxins. It is fortunate that the first complete study of passive immunity by Behring and Kitasato was with the soluble toxins of the tetanus and the diphtheria bacillus, so that the results, not only experimentally in animals but also in the treatment of human disease, were so unequivocal that the study of the principles and practice of serum therapy has never since languished. And yet in the intervening thirty-three years, no other such striking instances of serum therapy have been encountered, no other

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