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Article
May 2, 1925

AN ADEQUATE EXAMINATION: ESSENTIALS FROM THE STANDPOINT OF THE FUNDAMENTAL MEDICAL SCIENCES

Author Affiliations

Professor of Histology and Embryology, Western Reserve University School of Medicine CLEVELAND

JAMA. 1925;84(18):1315-1320. doi:10.1001/jama.1925.02660440001001
Abstract

The president of a leading university has recently written that "examination is the most difficult of the educational arts and its influence on both students and teachers may be very great." It may be added that, in some quarters, this difficult art appears to have had very little constructive study.

The choice and phrasing of questions for an examination requires from the examiner not only broad knowledge of the subject in hand, but careful judgment of relative values and, also, a keen appreciation of the purpose of the examination. On the part of the student is demanded a correct attitude toward the examination, and an appreciation of the opportunity it affords him for analysis of his own powers. Too often the student feels he is doing something to please the examiner, and that the examination is in a sense a penalty. Instead, he should consider it as an inspection of

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