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Article
May 9, 1925

VIABILITY OF BACILLUS TYPHOSUS IN OYSTERS DURING STORAGE

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO
From the Bureau of Laboratories, Chicago Department of Health.

JAMA. 1925;84(19):1403-1406. doi:10.1001/jama.1925.02660450011007
Abstract

Many epidemics of typhoid fever have been attributed to raw oysters grown in polluted waters. Conn,1 Pennington,2 Bulstrode,3 Thresh and Wood,4 Soper,5 Netter,6 Stiles,7 Brooks 8 and others have referred to oysters as the probable source of infection of more or less definite epidemics. More recently, a typhoid outbreak of 129 cases in Chicago, the epidemiology of which was reported by Bundesen,9 and concurrent outbreaks in other cities of the United States, have brought the subject of oyster-borne typhoid again into prominence. The evidence incriminating oysters in most of the reported cases has been epidemiologic in nature, for the actual isolation of B. typhosus has been accomplished in very few instances.

Klein,10 Johnstone11 and Stiles have reported the isolation of B. typhosus from oysters taken from sewage-contaminated beds. A typhoid-like organism reported by Johnstone did not conform strictly in its

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