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Article
May 9, 1925

THE ART AND PRACTICE OF MEDICAL WRITING: VIII. ILLUSTRATIONS

Author Affiliations

Editor and General Manager Emeritus, American Medical Association; Editor, The Journal of the American Medical Association CHICAGO

JAMA. 1925;84(19):1419-1421. doi:10.1001/jama.1925.26620450005014
Abstract

Editors of medical periodicals naturally are inclined to include all the illustrations that may be submitted by an author, regardless of whether or not all are necessary to bring out adequately the points made in the text, and regardless, indeed, of whether or not they bring out any point at all. The physician who reads medical periodicals is, or ought to be, familiar with the normal appearances, gross and microscopic, of the various organs; consequently, illustrations of normal conditions should be used only when absolutely required for the sake of contrast. The first rule regarding illustrations, therefore, is that they must illustrate.

HALFTONE ILLUSTRATIONS  The halftone process is used for reproducing photographs either of tissues or of appearances under the roentgen ray; also for the reproduction of charts or drawings with shading. When the photograph is being taken, the camera should be focused on the detail to be shown. It

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