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Article
May 16, 1925

RESULTS WITH THE SKIN TEST FOR SUSCEPTIBILITY TO SCARLET FEVER: PREVENTIVE IMMUNIZATION WITH SCARLET FEVER TOXIN

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO
From the John McCormick Institute for Infectious Diseases.

JAMA. 1925;84(20):1477-1481. doi:10.1001/jama.1925.02660460013007
Abstract

In January, 1923, we reported a skin test for susceptibility to scarlet fever,1 and in February of the same year, preventive immunization with scarlet fever toxin.2

The toxin was found in filtrates obtained from cultures of the hemolytic streptococci that had produced experimental scarlet fever in human beings.

By means of cultures, inoculation experiments,3 and the production of the corresponding antitoxin,4 we were able to show that we were dealing with a true toxin.

This toxin is resistant to heat at temperatures ordinarily employed to kill bacteria, but is destroyed at temperatures between 85 and 100 C.

The sterile toxin, injected into susceptible persons, is capable of producing the general malaise, nausea, vomiting, fever and rash of scarlet fever. The onset of these symptoms is preceded by a definite latent period such as characterizes the action of toxins in general, but much shorter than the incubation

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