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Article
September 15, 1923

RELATION OF LABORATORY AIDS TO THE PRACTICE OF MEDICINE AND SURGERY

JAMA. 1923;81(11):871-873. doi:10.1001/jama.1923.02650110001001
Abstract

To one, like myself, whose clinical life has stretched over a period well beyond thirty years, there is the constant inclination to compare the practice of medicine as it exists today with that as it existed when he began his work. One of the infallible signs of advancing years is the tendency to meditate on the changes that have taken place within one's personal experience. And to the physician who now has reached that meditative period, surely one of the most impressive facts in the evolution of the practice of medicine, as he has seen it, must be the tremendous growth of the laboratory side of medicine and the vast importance which these laboratory and instrumental aids have come to play in diagnosis and treatment.

When, in the summer of 1890, I entered the New York Hospital as an intern, the routine analysis of the urine and an occasional hemoglobin

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