[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 18.206.12.79. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
September 15, 1923

THE DIAGNOSIS OF EARLY BREAST TUMORS: BASED ON THE CLINICAL HISTORY AND PATHOLOGY AT THE EXPLORATORY INCISION

JAMA. 1923;81(11):875-882. doi:10.1001/jama.1923.02650110005003
Abstract

There are two types of research: One seeks for the unknown irrespective of the needs of the people. The other is a research for the practical and pressing needs of the people today.

When we study our 33,000 histories of patients recorded in the Surgical Pathological Laboratory of the Johns Hopkins Hospital since 1890 and search for the chief controllable factor in our failure to cure, it is the duration of the disease known to the patient and recorded by the answers to the questions: How long have you been ill? How long have you felt the lump?

Today, therefore, the chief hope of increasing the number of cures of cancer is the shortening of the duration of the disease. Apparently this can be accomplished only by the education of the public—giving them correct information.

If the lump felt by the patient proves to be cancer, its duration is the

×