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Article
June 13, 1925

SOME ASPECTS OF BLOOD CHEMISTRY IN PREGNANCY

JAMA. 1925;84(24):1827. doi:10.1001/jama.1925.02660500035019
Abstract

The acceptance of the view that protein metabolism involves primarily the transformations of amino-acids —the degradation products of the proteins—in the organism has placed diverse aspects of bodily function in a new light. It has become easier also to realize why the proteins that are found in the urine under a variety of pathologic conditions are different from the albuminous compounds that are ingested. Wells 1 has pointed out that numerous attempts have been made by both chemical and immunologic methods to determine whether the proteins in the urine in nephritis come from the food, the blood, or from the renal cells themselves. In alimentary albuminuria, the urinary proteins seem not to be those of the food, but human proteins. In nephritis, differentiation between serum proteins and kidney proteins has not yet been satisfactorily accomplished.

If urinary proteins do not represent the undestroyed residues of food proteins, it becomes a

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